Indicators
X3 Bonus points added value

Schools can earn positive or negative bonus points if the efficiency of upper secondary school is above or below the level that one would expect based on the initial quality of the students. The initial quality is calculated on the basis of the average recommendations of the primary school of the pupils, the percentage of students that entered the school in later years, the percentage of LWOO students (only for VMBO schools), the percentage of students from poor neighborhoods, and the social economic background of the students. If the actual efficiency of upper secondary schools lies above the expected level based on the initial quality, the school has a positive added value. While a negative value is obtained, if the actual efficiency of upper secondary schools is lower than can be expected on the basis of the primary school teacher recommendations.

Schools with the 10% most positive added value get one bonus point, schools with the 20% most positive value get 0.5 bonus point. Schools with the 10% most negative added value get one negative bonus point; schools with the 20% most negative value get -0.5 bonus point.

X3.1 Efficiency of upper secondary school
The efficiency of upper secondary schools is a combination of the percentage of students in upper secondary school that graduate in the nominal duration, the success rate for the final exam (X2.3), the average grade for the school exams (X3.3) and the average grade for the final examination (X3.4 ) (click here for further explanations).

X3.2 Average recommendations third class
At the end of primary school all pupils get an advice on what level of education (VMBOb/k/gt, HAVO, VWO) suits them best. The average primary school recommendation of the students in the third class is used to identify the initial quality of the students and thus to calculate the added value of the school.

X3.3 Percentage of students that entered the school in later years
This percentage is copied from the data of the Education Inspectorate.

X3.4 percentage of LWOO students
LWOO means 'Leerwegondersteunend onderwijs' or education with learning support. These LWOO students are pre-vocational students who have enough capacity to to get a diploma, but need extra help. This percentage is taken directly from the inspection data. These percentages are known only for the VMBO (lower secondary vocational) schools.

X3.5 percentage of students from poor neighborhoods
This percentage is copied from the data of the Education Inspectorate.

X3.6 Social economic background of the students
For each BRIN number (school number) and or each school location is, on the site of the DUO, the four digit postal code of all students from that location available. We have combined this postal code with the best available indicator of the social economic indicator of that neighborhood: the so-called 'Leefbaarometer'. This indicator gives for each four-digit postal code a score on a large number of dimensions. From those dimension, we have chosen the population composition dimension ('bevolkingssamenstelling', version 2012), because it uses both education and income data. The rating on this dimension is the sum of (all by postal code) the proportion of unemployed but looking for a job, the number of households with at most 2 times average earnings, the percentage with households with minimum earnings, the share of more than 2 times average income, the proportion of non-Western immigrants, the proportion of highly educated. This dimension varies from -50 ( lowest score ) to +50 ( highest score ). The average score of all students in the school (not just the graduation candidates) on this indicator is the socioeconomic composition of the student population.

X3.7 Average SE grade
For each course, the average grade for all candidates on the school exams during upper secondary schools.

X3.8 Average CE grade
For each course, the average grade of all candidates on the final exams.
X4 Bonus points SE grades

Schools with many courses with a too big difference between SE and CE grades (See: X4.1 Number of courses with too high SE grades) get negative points. An SE-CE difference according to the Education Inspectorate is too large when this is greater than 0.5.

The 10% of schools with the most courses with a too big SE-CE difference get one negative bonus point, the 20% of schools with the most courses with a too big SE-CE difference get half a negative bonus point. Schools with few courses with a large SE-CE difference get positive points: the 10% of schools with the fewest courses 1, 20% of schools with the fewest courses 0.5.

X4.1 Number of courses with a too high difference between CE and SE grades
For each school, the number of courses with a SE-CE difference greater than 0.5 are counted. The inspection rule is that the difference in SE-CE grades per course on average may not be greater than 0.5.
More information?

See Explanation.
 
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2013
X2. Rating passed courses

The basic grade of the school is a grade based on the average number of passed (core) subjects. A school has passed a course if the graduated candidates for the national written exam (ie the final exam) have obtained on average a six-minus (5.899). The rule to give, based on the average grades per course, a rating for each school is the same as that for the student taking the final exam: If more than one core course is made insufficiently, the school (like the student) has failed. With more than 2 non-core courses made insufficiently, the school (like the pupil) has also failed. The exact distribution of the Rating passed courses (grades between 1 and 10) is determined on the basis of the exact number of failed (core) courses (click here for further explanations).

Because the average grade of the successful candidates is not known, we use the final exam success rate and the average grade of all candidates to make an estimate of the average grade of the successful candidates (for further explanation here).

X2.1 Number of failed subjects
The number of courses for which the successful candidates for the final exam have on average scored insufficiently.

X2.2 Number of failed core subjects
The number of core courses (consisting of Dutch, English, Mathematics for HAVO and VWO, Dutch and Mathematics for VMBO) for which the successful candidates for the final exam have on average scored insufficiently.

X2.3 Success rate final exams
The success rate of the students who took part in the final exam. This is used, together with the estimated average grades per course of all participants (successful and failed students), to make an estimate of the average grade per course of the graduated participants.
X1. School exam rating

The school exam grade consists of a figure based on the average number of failed (core) courses at a school (See: X2 Rating passed subjects). This figure is respectively increased or decreased depending on whether the efficiency of upper secondary school is above or below the level that one would expect based on the initial quality of the students (See: X3 Bonus points added value) and depending on whether the school had many or few courses with on average a too large difference between the grades of the final exam and the school exam (See: X4 Bonus points SE digits).
Introduction figures

All figures used are from the Education Inspectorate. Below we briefly explain which operations we have carried out with the inspection numbers.